[Japanese Pilgrimage] EBOOK / KINDLE


  • Paperback
  • 349
  • Japanese Pilgrimage
  • Oliver Statler
  • English
  • 08 September 2020
  • 9780688018900

Oliver Statler ↠ 1 SUMMARY

SUMMARY ¹ Japanese Pilgrimage READ Japanese Pilgrimage Japanese Pilgramage' is Oliver Statler's account of walking the Shikoku Pilgrimage a thousan. From the writer s afterword in 1983 and its brownish pages I did not think I would enjoy or finish reading this paperback at all However I found it amazingly readable and informative since Oliver Statler has written from his direct experiences as a pilgrim on the island of Shikoku with Nobuo Morikawa his Japanese friend along the formidable thousand mile almost two month journey in 1971 his first being in 1968 p 335His style of writing is uniuely challenging for instance he narrates his pilgrimage like telling what he does sees reacts etc naturally to his friends over he does not write about all 88 temples but he simply states that it depends rather he has told his readers intensively on those interestingly holy charismatic and highly respected priests dating back than 1000 years ago for example the great Kobo Daishi 774 835 as seen from a 14th century copy detail of the original painting p 23 is possibly the most admiredrevered one One may be wondering or in doubt on such a remote figure this excerpt reveals his fame The eminent historian Sir George Sanson called him the greatest figure in the history of Japanese religion As the founder of Shingon a major sect he is a giant figure in the naturalization of Buddhism in molding it to flourish in Japan He is one of his country s greatest scholars a poet a calligrapher an artist an educator a social worker and among other things a first rate civil engineer p 22Moreover a few paragraphs of the following narration would shed light on how the Daishi s expertise in civil engineering has since been famousHe arrived in the early summer of 821 the people rushed to him in such a haste says the chronicle of those years that many slipped into their sandals wrong foot too He began with a fire ceremony and prayers an inlet in today s reservoir marks the spot To the crowd assembled he explained that he had been given an imperial order to reconstruct the pond he asked for their help they gave it The job was completed in less than three monthsThis and other reservoirs that he was associated with demonstrate that he had an advanced knowledge of civil engineering For instance the dam is curved back against the impounded water engineers today are often surprised to find that he knew that principle The earthen dam that he built has never failed I feel a sense of exhilaration after being asked so often to take on faith that he did this and that it is tonic to stand before a certified achievement This reservoir alone would account for the faith in the Daishi among farmersThere is a statue of him overlooking the lake and higher on the shore a temple We seek out the priest and he gives us some figures This is the fourth largest irrigation reservoir in Japan the largest held by an earthen dam The dam is than 500 feet long rises 105 feet from the valley floor It is nearly 13 miles around the edge of the lake which irrigates almost 12000 acres than one eighth of the Sanuki plain It is named Manno ike the Pond for Ten Thousand Fields pp 304 305This book is I think uite reader friendly that is you would find it enticingly captivating due to its generous black and white illustrations 2 maps 16 paintings 18 prints 2 calligraphies 7 illustrations 8 sculpture carvingsphotos and 2 drawings Hopefully some color ones should be considered and processed in its future hi tech printing The Cambridge Handbook of Social Problems great Kobo Daishi 774 835 as seen from a 14th century copy detail of the original painting p 23 is possibly the most admiredrevered one One may be wondering or in doubt on such a remote figure this excerpt reveals his fame The eminent historian Sir George Sanson called him the Handbook of Psychophysiology greatest figure in the history of Japanese religion As the founder of Shingon a major sect he is a When Movements Become Parties gave it The job was completed in less than three monthsThis and other reservoirs that he was associated with demonstrate that he had an advanced knowledge of civil engineering For instance the dam is curved back against the impounded water engineers today are often surprised to find that he knew that principle The earthen dam that he built has never failed I feel a sense of exhilaration after being asked so often to take on faith that he did this and that it is tonic to stand before a certified achievement This reservoir alone would account for the faith in the Daishi among farmersThere is a statue of him overlooking the lake and higher on the shore a temple We seek out the priest and he 月下夢幻譚神無夜話 6 gives us some figures This is the fourth largest irrigation reservoir in Japan the largest held by an earthen dam The dam is than 500 feet long rises 105 feet from the valley floor It is nearly 13 miles around the edge of the lake which irrigates almost 12000 acres than one eighth of the Sanuki plain It is named Manno ike the Pond for Ten Thousand Fields pp 304 305This book is I think uite reader friendly that is you would find it enticingly captivating due to its Illegal Affairs generous black and white illustrations 2 maps 16 paintings 18 prints 2 calligraphies 7 illustrations 8 sculpture carvingsphotos and 2 drawings Hopefully some color ones should be considered and processed in its future hi tech printing

CHARACTERS Å PSSBIGCARBOW.XYZ ↠ Oliver Statler

Japanese Pilgrimage

SUMMARY ¹ Japanese Pilgrimage READ Japanese Pilgrimage D mile trek around the fourth largest island in Japan following the path of an ancient Buddh. This is where one begins On this mountaintop at the holiest spot of this sprawling complex of temples in the shadow of these towering cedars one stands before the tomb of the saint whose life and legacy inspire the pilgrimage Here one asks his blessing his guidance and protection his company on the pilgrimage to comeOne of the things still suarely on my ToDo list is the Shikoku Pilgrimage of 88 Temples A few times I have dipped in a toe so to speak by visiting No 1 Ryozenji in Tokushima No 31 Chikurinji in Kochi No 51 Ishiteji in Matsuyama and No 84 Yashimaji near Takamatsu But these were random visits and not part of a pilgrimage While this big but pleasant task is still glittering in my future I am thinking about the book that first aroused my interest in the Shikoku Pilgrimage Japanese Pilgrimage by Oliver Statler It was Statler s fascinating account that made me fantasize about threading in the footsteps of Kobo Daishi In this expertly written book the author combines a personal account of the Pilgrimage with substantial cultural information on the topic I first read Japanese Pilgrimage in the mid 1980s and that book now is so brown and broken that I have to be careful when turning the brittle pages I think I have read it at least three timesOliver Statler 1915 2002 graduated from the University of Chicago and came to Japan with the American army in 1947 He was gripped by the beauty of wood block prints of which he became an internationally known expert His interest in the Pilgrimage dated from a first visit to Shikoku in 1961 he first performed the whole 1000 mile circular pilgrimage in 1968 From 1969 1971 he lived in Matsuyama on Shikoku in order to further study the pilgrimage and in 1971 he made the entire pilgrimage again with a Japanese friend this is the biographical account we find in the book It was a Guggenheim Fellowship which permitted him in 1973 to finally write the book which was first published in 1983As Japanese Pilgrimage shows Statler was a beautiful stylist of the English language His account is a lyrical impressionistic portrait of the Shikoku Pilgrimage anecdotal and episodic and yet securely built on an underlying narrative plan It is well researched and highly evocative of Japanese religiosity as it functions in daily life It also contains biographical information about the priests and pilgrims prominent in the long history of the pilgrimage starting with Kobo Daishi 774 835 saint miracle worker flamboyant evangelist scholar poet and even later a deity He struggled to find the right way here in the mountains of Shikoku and he sought it in China where he inherited the mantle of a great esoteric Buddhist master He finally reached the understanding that all human beings possess the seed of Buddha and can with hard effort nurture that seed and reach enlightenment during this present lifeThe book is divided into three sections In the first one Master Statler gives an outline of the historical personage of Kukai later known by his honorific as Kobo Daishi the 8th9th century monk and founder of the Shingon school of Buddhism in Japan upon whom the pilgrimage is focused In the second part Savior Statler attempts to portray how layers of legend and belief enlarged Kobo Daishi and how faith in him as a divine savior was spread among the populace by wandering itinerant holy men hijiri Finally in the third section Pilgrims the pilgrimage itself comes into sharper focus both through discussions with current pilgrims and priests and accounts of past pilgrims such as the Kabuki actor Ichikawa Danzo VIII and haiku poet Masaoka ShikiAnd while telling these three stories Statler shares with the reader his own experiences of the thousand mile journey a demanding route through deep mountings and along rugged coasts taking almost two months to walk All three sections are full of legends folk stories anecdotes and miracle tales that perfectly capture the mood and feel of the pilgrimagePerhaps to cut back on Japanese names for those not used to the language Statler calls the 88 temples by number Number One etc but at the back of the book he provides a concordance with the temple names The author also skips back and forth without discussing all 88 temples and doesn t give any practical information in other words this is not a guidebook It is a book about the spirit of the pilgrimage its history and its culture You don t even actually have to perform it to enjoy this fine account But that is a dangerous thought for me it could make me lazy for the Pilgrimage is still waiting on my very doorstep as I now live in Kobe instead of TokyoRemember the Pilgrimage is circular and like a circle it has neither a beginning nor an end like the uest for Enlightenment it is unendingAlso see my blog 月下夢幻譚神無夜話 6 guidance and protection his company on the pilgrimage to comeOne of the things still suarely on my ToDo list is the Shikoku Pilgrimage of 88 Temples A few times I have dipped in a toe so to speak by visiting No 1 Ryozenji in Tokushima No 31 Chikurinji in Kochi No 51 Ishiteji in Matsuyama and No 84 Yashimaji near Takamatsu But these were random visits and not part of a pilgrimage While this big but pleasant task is still Illegal Affairs glittering in my future I am thinking about the book that first aroused my interest in the Shikoku Pilgrimage Japanese Pilgrimage by Oliver Statler It was Statler s fascinating account that made me fantasize about threading in the footsteps of Kobo Daishi In this expertly written book the author combines a personal account of the Pilgrimage with substantial cultural information on the topic I first read Japanese Pilgrimage in the mid 1980s and that book now is so brown and broken that I have to be careful when turning the brittle pages I think I have read it at least three timesOliver Statler 1915 2002 Angel of Sudden Hill gripped by the beauty of wood block prints of which he became an internationally known expert His interest in the Pilgrimage dated from a first visit to Shikoku in 1961 he first performed the whole 1000 mile circular pilgrimage in 1968 From 1969 1971 he lived in Matsuyama on Shikoku in order to further study the pilgrimage and in 1971 he made the entire pilgrimage again with a Japanese friend this is the biographical account we find in the book It was a Guggenheim Fellowship which permitted him in 1973 to finally write the book which was first published in 1983As Japanese Pilgrimage shows Statler was a beautiful stylist of the English language His account is a lyrical impressionistic portrait of the Shikoku Pilgrimage anecdotal and episodic and yet securely built on an underlying narrative plan It is well researched and highly evocative of Japanese religiosity as it functions in daily life It also contains biographical information about the priests and pilgrims prominent in the long history of the pilgrimage starting with Kobo Daishi 774 835 saint miracle worker flamboyant evangelist scholar poet and even later a deity He struggled to find the right way here in the mountains of Shikoku and he sought it in China where he inherited the mantle of a The Complete Anchoring Handbook great esoteric Buddhist master He finally reached the understanding that all human beings possess the seed of Buddha and can with hard effort nurture that seed and reach enlightenment during this present lifeThe book is divided into three sections In the first one Master Statler Screams and Nightmares The Films of Wes Craven gives an outline of the historical personage of Kukai later known by his honorific as Kobo Daishi the 8th9th century monk and founder of the Shingon school of Buddhism in Japan upon whom the pilgrimage is focused In the second part Savior Statler attempts to portray how layers of legend and belief enlarged Kobo Daishi and how faith in him as a divine savior was spread among the populace by wandering itinerant holy men hijiri Finally in the third section Pilgrims the pilgrimage itself comes into sharper focus both through discussions with current pilgrims and priests and accounts of past pilgrims such as the Kabuki actor Ichikawa Danzo VIII and haiku poet Masaoka ShikiAnd while telling these three stories Statler shares with the reader his own experiences of the thousand mile journey a demanding route through deep mountings and along rugged coasts taking almost two months to walk All three sections are full of legends folk stories anecdotes and miracle tales that perfectly capture the mood and feel of the pilgrimagePerhaps to cut back on Japanese names for those not used to the language Statler calls the 88 temples by number Number One etc but at the back of the book he provides a concordance with the temple names The author also skips back and forth without discussing all 88 temples and doesn t Muay Thai Unleashed give any practical information in other words this is not a Practical Boat Mechanics guidebook It is a book about the spirit of the pilgrimage its history and its culture You don t even actually have to perform it to enjoy this fine account But that is a dangerous thought for me it could make me lazy for the Pilgrimage is still waiting on my very doorstep as I now live in Kobe instead of TokyoRemember the Pilgrimage is circular and like a circle it has neither a beginning nor an end like the uest for Enlightenment it is unendingAlso see my blog

READ Japanese Pilgrimage

SUMMARY ¹ Japanese Pilgrimage READ Japanese Pilgrimage Ist master It is a fascinating story of a spiritual journey that shows the many sides of Jap. I lived in Shikoku for six years and I did the 88 Temples pilgrimage in 2011 with my dad This book was the inspiration for that An excellent and deeply personal travelogue


7 thoughts on “[Japanese Pilgrimage] EBOOK / KINDLE

  1. says: CHARACTERS Å PSSBIGCARBOW.XYZ ↠ Oliver Statler Oliver Statler ↠ 1 SUMMARY READ Japanese Pilgrimage

    READ Japanese Pilgrimage [Japanese Pilgrimage] EBOOK / KINDLE CHARACTERS Å PSSBIGCARBOW.XYZ ↠ Oliver Statler From the writer's afterword in 1983 and its brownish pages I did not think I would enjoy or finish reading this paperback

  2. says: [Japanese Pilgrimage] EBOOK / KINDLE

    Oliver Statler ↠ 1 SUMMARY CHARACTERS Å PSSBIGCARBOW.XYZ ↠ Oliver Statler READ Japanese Pilgrimage Statler followed the pilgrimage trail of Kobo Daishi one of the men who brought Buddhism to Japan The modern pilgrimage bears little resemblance to the original Buddha's teachings or perhaps even to Kobo Daishi's;

  3. says: [Japanese Pilgrimage] EBOOK / KINDLE

    [Japanese Pilgrimage] EBOOK / KINDLE Very evocative a fairly dense book and I did find myself wishing it was of a travelogue in order around the pilgrimage path it actually jumps ar

  4. says: [Japanese Pilgrimage] EBOOK / KINDLE

    [Japanese Pilgrimage] EBOOK / KINDLE This is where one begins On this mountaintop at the holiest spot of this sprawling complex of temples in the shadow of these towering cedars one stands before the tomb of the saint whose life and legacy inspire the pilgrimage Here one asks his blessing his guidance and protection his company on the pilgrimage to comeOne of the things still suarely on my ToDo list is the Shikoku Pilgrimage of 88 Temples A few times I have dipped

  5. says: [Japanese Pilgrimage] EBOOK / KINDLE CHARACTERS Å PSSBIGCARBOW.XYZ ↠ Oliver Statler Oliver Statler ↠ 1 SUMMARY

    Oliver Statler ↠ 1 SUMMARY CHARACTERS Å PSSBIGCARBOW.XYZ ↠ Oliver Statler [Japanese Pilgrimage] EBOOK / KINDLE This is the best English book on the 88 Sacred Places of Shikoku Pilgrimage Statler completed this journey several time and researc

  6. says: READ Japanese Pilgrimage Oliver Statler ↠ 1 SUMMARY CHARACTERS Å PSSBIGCARBOW.XYZ ↠ Oliver Statler

    [Japanese Pilgrimage] EBOOK / KINDLE I lived in Shikoku for six years and I did the 88 Temples pilgrimage in 2011 with my dad This book was the inspiration fo

  7. says: [Japanese Pilgrimage] EBOOK / KINDLE

    [Japanese Pilgrimage] EBOOK / KINDLE Meet the author in Miami

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